Wild things: wining best visual arts for the 2019 National Institute for Humanities and Social Science

I was honoured to be awarded the 2019 winner of the National Institute for Humanities and Social Science in the best visual arts category. https://www.timeslive.co.za/sunday-times/books/news/2019-03-18-humanities-and-social-sciences-hss-awards-2019-winners-announced/?fbclid=IwAR1YHoagPTK4R8zYHApjZxUCrFPG86Mr3k9AwfeRf5M4NZzhQZKJVjZJDZY      

Image by Desire Clarke

South Atlantic Hauntings

For the last while I have been in the throws of a PhD. I was writing as well as making art which was the site of my theoretical enquiry. The writing may yet become something more in the world, but for now I can share  the creative work, or the documentation of it. This link will take you there…  https://southatlantichuntings.squarespace.com/   I presented a number of site specific installations towards my a larger research project titled South Atlantic Hauntings: Geographies of Memory, Ancestralities and Re-Memberings. In it I engage with the possibilities for speaking from spaces of elision through the theoretical constructs…

After Saudades

The Johannesburg Art Gallery (JAG) sits forlorn in the midst of Johannesburg as a shadow of its former grandeur. The vocabulary of its architecture, the bulk of its sandstone frame with entablature and great pillars, carry a nostalgia for the empire on whose back and in whose image it was built. The museum sits quiet and almost forgotten, an island of sad neglect in the centre of a city overflowing with life around it. In 2014, I presented an art installation at JAG as part of the group exhibition So Long: Tag For JAG that was staged in the basement…

Artist and filmmaker Kitso Lynn Lelliott on disrupting knowledge hierarchies – From the Bubblegumclub

Michel-Rolph Trouillot in his book Silencing the Past: The Power and the Production of History interrogates ideas about the history and pastness, demonstrating how positions of power silence certain voices from History. He points to how oppressive, destructive and inhuman interpretations of people of colour led to colonial powers not being able to imagine histories or a History that could be animated, directed and authored by people of colour. The work of Kitso Lynn Lelliott also unpacks the philosophical and ontological constructions of race that emerged during European Imperialism, which resulted in multilayered tools and attitudes for ‘Othering’. One of the most important tool…